The Wake Forest University Department of Anthropology promotes understanding and appreciation of human cultural and biological diversity. Through academic courses, scholarly and applied research, and public service, the Department of Anthropology provides the Wake Forest community with the tools and knowledge necessary for global citizenship. Composed of scholars representing all sub-fields of anthropology, the Department of Anthropology serves as the premier academic and practical resource for multicultural awareness and education in the University and Winston-Salem communities, enhancing the University’s commitment to Pro Humanitate.

Department of Anthropology News


Anthropology in the National Press

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Wake Forest University Anthropology Department

Wake Forest University Anthropology Department

Wake Forest University's Anthropology Department: visit our page to access news, updates, events & connect with students, faculty, and alumni.

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We have not only one, but two, new Assistant Professors joining us this year! Jessica MacLellan, Ph.D. is an archaeologist interested in ritual, household archaeology, ceramics, and the development of complex societies in Mesoamerica and lower Central America. She earned her Ph.D. at the University of Arizona in 2019.

Since 2012, Dr. MacLellan has investigated early households at the Maya site of Ceibal, in Guatemala, as part of the Ceibal-Petexbatún Archaeological Project. She focuses on the role of domestic and supra-household rituals in early Maya society. That research has been supported by the National Science Foundation, the Society for American Archaeology, and others. As of 2021, Dr. MacLellan is also investigating pre-Hispanic archaeological sites in the Azuero Peninsula of Panama, with colleagues at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute.

In addition to her research, Dr. MacLellan is committed to undergraduate teaching and archaeological public outreach. More information can be found on her personal website: jessicamaclellan.com

Welcome, Jessica! We’re thrilled to have you join WFU Anthropology!
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We have not only one, but two, new Assistant Professors joining us this year! Jessica MacLellan, Ph.D. is an archaeologist interested in ritual, household archaeology, ceramics, and the development of complex societies in Mesoamerica and lower Central America. She earned her Ph.D. at the University of Arizona in 2019.

Since 2012, Dr. MacLellan has investigated early households at the Maya site of Ceibal, in Guatemala, as part of the Ceibal-Petexbatún Archaeological Project. She focuses on the role of domestic and supra-household rituals in early Maya society. That research has been supported by the National Science Foundation, the Society for American Archaeology, and others. As of 2021, Dr. MacLellan is also investigating pre-Hispanic archaeological sites in the Azuero Peninsula of Panama, with colleagues at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute.

In addition to her research, Dr. MacLellan is committed to undergraduate teaching and archaeological public outreach. More information can be found on her personal website: jessicamaclellan.com

Welcome, Jessica! Were thrilled to have you join WFU Anthropology!

ICYMI: Professor Emeritus of Anthropology David Evans (P ’97) died recently. Evans joined the Wake Forest University faculty in 1966 and retired in 1998. In 1967, he founded the Overseas Research Center and Ethnographic Field School in Belize. For many years he led field research trips to Venezuela, Scotland, England, Belize, Costa Rica, Saba Island, Netherland Antilles, Roatan Island and Honduras. He received the first Reid-Doyle Award for Excellence in Teaching in 1971. Obituary: legcy.co/3dlBx7Q Wake Forest University Anthropology Department Lam Museum of Anthropology, Wake Forest University See MoreSee Less

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He was a salty old dog and I never knew what would come out of his mouth. His filter was thin and his heart was big. What a loss for the world of anthropology.

One of my all time favorites. I just started teaching anthropology and owe so much to him. His class started it all. 💛🖤

Dr. Evans was an incredible teacher of Anthropology. I went on his field school trip to Roatan in 2003, returned as an assistant and do research for an honor’s thesis, and later for master’s research when he offered up the Overseas Research Center for me to stay. The ORC was truly a special place for a field school. He’d planted fruit trees all over the property and the house was filled with furniture made by a talented local friend of his. We’d spend time as students picking bananas and papayas for our breakfast and he’d send us searching for the hideaway in each piece of furniture. The discussions that I had with him shaped in many ways how I teach and think about Anthropology and research today as a professor in the field. He was a master storyteller-both of his own stories and those of others. I’m not surprised that he wrote two novels. I recall one story about him starting up a small entrepreneurial business as a child (maybe he was 12 or 13?) – he used his dingy boat to earn money taking sailors from their ship to the mainland in Norfolk and back again for a night out. His sarcasm was legendary among the students he taught and when you were able to keep up he was delighted. The only time I ever saw him speechless, was when, as a field school group, we commissioned an artist from Roatan named Melvin to create a wooden bust carving of him as a gift. We used the photo of him from the back of the Judasbird book as a model and it turned out to be quite the likeness. I think he had no idea what to make of it! Do you remember this Dana Olson Emily Jones? I’m saddened to hear this news and glad I was able to visit him about 8 years ago in NC while I was working on my PhD. Sending love to his family.

So sorry to hear of this.

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